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Animal Care Projects

Your Animal Care Projects archive

This archive contains just a few of the many projects supported by BIAZA members every year. Many of these projects are BIAZA annual award winners and commendations.  

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Dec 5, 2013

Giant Otters are endangered as a result of major habitat loss and hunting threats in the rainforests and wetlands of South America. 

Dec 5, 2013

Amphibians are in trouble, 1/3 of the 7,000 described species are threatened with extinction. 

Dec 5, 2013

Chimpanzees are gregarious, social apes that naturally live in large multi-male, multi-female social groups.

Dec 5, 2013

Because of their strength and agility historically leopard sub-species are kept in enclosed mesh roofed exhibits and as a result, generally to do with the cost or feasibility of roofing a large area, the exhibits tend to end up with a small surface area.

Dec 5, 2013

We have an aging animal population in zoos. Many species are living longer than they would in the wild and succumb to old age diseases which should be diagnosed and managed as appropriate.

Dec 5, 2013

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality of captive great apes.

Aug 16, 2013
Dudley Zoo's major contirbution to this important project for a native species
Aug 16, 2013
Dietary manipulation to reduce elevated blood cholesterol in captive meerkats (Suricata suricatta)
Aug 16, 2013

ZSL London Zoo's important advance in husbandry guidelines

Aug 16, 2013
Bristol Zoo's endangered Livingsonte's fruit bats

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Paignton Zoo's Great Big Rhino Project has made crucial donations of cash to wildlife conservation on two continents. The Project is to give £60,000 to support work in Africa and South East Asia to protect rhinos in the wild. More

Collaborative research by the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Bristol Zoological Society and the Comorian NGO Dahari has revealed the Livingstone’s fruit bat is likely to be the most endangered fruit bat in the world. 

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New data released by WWF and ZSL (Zoological Society of London) today reveals that overall global vertebrate populations are on course to decline by an average of 67 per cent from 1970 levels by the end of this decade, unless urgent action is taken to reduce humanity’s impact on species and ecosystems.

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