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Conservation Projects

Your Conservation Projects archive

This archive contains just a few of the 700+ projects supported by BIAZA members every year. Many of these projects are BIAZA annual award winners and commendations.  

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Dec 5, 2013

Paignton Zoo aimed to develop a method of harvesting and hand-rearing wild cirl bunting nestlings and use this method to establish a self-sustaining population in Cornwall. 

Dec 5, 2013

The white-naped mangabey, is now only found in the Upper Guinean Rainforest of eastern Ivory Coast and western Ghana (West Africa), and has been classified as Endangered by the IUCN, which states that the population has reduced by as much as 50% in the last 27 years.

Dec 5, 2013

Elephant people conflict project which aims to benefit both the people and the elephants

Aug 16, 2013

Durrell initiated in-situ work in Menabe in 1992

Aug 16, 2013

Project Angonoka, started in 1986, is a collaborative enterprise between Water and Forests Department and Durrell Wildlife.

Aug 16, 2013

Paignton Zoo has been supporting conservation in the Omo Forest Reserve since 1993.

Aug 16, 2013
Genetics project of the scimitar-horned oryx
Aug 16, 2013
ZSL London Zoo's long-term action plan for French Polynesia's endemic tree snails
Aug 16, 2013
Marwell Zoo's Eelmoor Marsh project
Dec 6, 2012
SSSI heathland restoration

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Paignton Zoo's Great Big Rhino Project has made crucial donations of cash to wildlife conservation on two continents. The Project is to give £60,000 to support work in Africa and South East Asia to protect rhinos in the wild. More

Collaborative research by the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Bristol Zoological Society and the Comorian NGO Dahari has revealed the Livingstone’s fruit bat is likely to be the most endangered fruit bat in the world. 

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New data released by WWF and ZSL (Zoological Society of London) today reveals that overall global vertebrate populations are on course to decline by an average of 67 per cent from 1970 levels by the end of this decade, unless urgent action is taken to reduce humanity’s impact on species and ecosystems.

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