http://www.biaza.org.uk/uploads/images/banners/gorillaMike Bungard.jpg

Research Projects

Your Research Projects archive

This archive contains just a few of the many projects supported by BIAZA members every year. Many of these projects are BIAZA annual award winners and commendations.  

Page 1 of 3  > >>

Apr 4, 2016
The Research Committee have supported 17 projects carried out with the assistance of BIAZA members in 2015.
Dec 5, 2013

Identifying individuals during the study and management of animal populations is often difficult and has lead to the development of various methods of marking to facilitate re-sightings.

Dec 5, 2013

The correct interpretation of alarm calls, including those of other species, is essential for predator avoidance.

Dec 5, 2013

The aim of this research was to determine the sustainability of European captive population of eastern black rhinoceros, and investigate factors that may influence population performance.

Aug 16, 2013
Work in West Africa to understand the supply chain for bushmeat 
Aug 16, 2013
Research showed that the Komodo dragon could produce young from unfertilised eggs 
Aug 16, 2013
Visitor interest in zoo animals and the implications for collection planning and zoo education programmes
Aug 16, 2013
Social and environmental influences on the welfare of zoo-housed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi rufiventris
Aug 16, 2013

Male – male social interactions in breeder and bachelor groups of gorillas (Gorilla gorilla): an indication of behavioural flexibility

Dec 6, 2012
Do zoo visitors need zoology knowledge to understand about biodiversity conservation?

Page 1 of 3  > >>




Text size A A A

T +44 (0) 20 7449 6599
E admin@biaza.org.uk

Paignton Zoo's Great Big Rhino Project has made crucial donations of cash to wildlife conservation on two continents. The Project is to give £60,000 to support work in Africa and South East Asia to protect rhinos in the wild. More

Collaborative research by the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Bristol Zoological Society and the Comorian NGO Dahari has revealed the Livingstone’s fruit bat is likely to be the most endangered fruit bat in the world. 

More

New data released by WWF and ZSL (Zoological Society of London) today reveals that overall global vertebrate populations are on course to decline by an average of 67 per cent from 1970 levels by the end of this decade, unless urgent action is taken to reduce humanity’s impact on species and ecosystems.

More

Bookmark and Share