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Dec 5, 2013

ZSL's Successful Breeding Management and Reproductive Research of the Endangered White-naped Mangabey, Cercocebus ayts lunulatus


The white-naped mangabey, is now only found in the Upper Guinean Rainforest of eastern Ivory Coast and western Ghana (West Africa), and has been classified as Endangered by the IUCN, which states that the population has reduced by as much as 50% in the last 27 years.

The white-naped mangabey, is now only found in the Upper Guinean Rainforest of eastern Ivory Coast and western Ghana (West Africa), and has been classified as Endangered by the IUCN, which states that the population has reduced by as much as 50% in the last 27 years. Deforestation is the greatest threat according to a recent report; the Upper Guinean Forests has been reduced to a mere 15% of its original forest cover. (Oates et al 2012)

In 2013 the captive population is 71 individuals including those at the WAPCA* Endangered Breeding Centre in Ghana. 

In 2007, ZSL received two females from European collections and a male from the centre in Ghana, providing a unique blood line to the European population.   The species historically have a high rate of neonatal death (over 54% neonatal deaths between 1999-2011) producing an unstable predicted survival rate in captivity (Abello 2012).  With this prediction and the genetic significance successful breeding was of paramount importance.

ZSL have established accurate reproductive management techniques through detailed record keeping.   Better knowledge of the species reproduction has resulted in 5 offspring including the successfully hand-reared and full integration of a female. 

ZSL’s has conducted neonatal research on behalf of the EEP, the results of which have been presented on an international level and contributed to the 2012 Husbandry Guidelines. ZSL produced the BIAZA Care Sheet; is the BIAZA key advisor for hand rearing and spokes-person for the BIAZA ‘Top Ten Mammals Most Reliant on Zoos for Conservation’ for which mangabeys are listed.



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