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News from BIAZA

Sep 25, 2015

BIAZA zoo colleagues Trek for Tigers!


This autumn, staff from different UK zoos are banding together on a mission to help save Sumatran tigers from extinction in the wild.

BIAZA zoo members taking part include Sarah Forsyth and Clive Barwick from Colchester Zoo, Rebecca Willers from Shepreth Wildlife Conservation Charity, Hayley Potter from Woburn Safari Park, Lynn Whitnall from Paradise Wildlife Park and Wildlife Heritage Foundation, and Charlotte Corney from Isle of Wight Zoo.

They will team up to trek across the Kerinci Seblat National Park in Sumatra with the Tiger Protection Conservation Unit (TPCU) - dismantling lethal poaching snares as they go.

They will need to be entirely self-sufficient during the trek, carrying everything on their backs with no help from porters.

As well as dealing with difficult terrain, flooding and hot and humid conditions, they’ll have to watch out for wild animals, poachers and a whole host of creepy crawlies!

You can help the team raise money for the TPCU - who take this route every couple of weeks - by donating via Just Giving.

All money raised will be passed on to Flora & Fauna International, who manage the project in Sumatra.

https://www.justgiving.com/sarah-forsyth2

https://www.justgiving.com/Tigertrek/

https://www.justgiving.com/Hayley-Potter3/




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