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Apr 11, 2017

Restaurant Manager


Wildwood Escot
Devon

Job Title: Restaurant Manager

Term: Permanent, full time position

Function: To manage all restaurant operations

Site Line Manager: General Manager

Salary: £19,000 - £21,000

Closing date for applications: 25th April, 2017

We are looking for someone to join the Wildwood Management Team as manager of our popular Coach House Restaurant. The focus of the role is to deliver and strategically develop a quality and profitable catering operation which enhances the visitor experience. The candidate will be overseeing the day-to-day management of the restaurant whilst leading on the strategic development of the business, as well as leading and motivating the team.

The post holder’s key tasks will be:

• Planning menus
• Ordering supplies
• Hiring, training, supervising and motivating permanent and casual staff
• Organising staff rotas
• Ensuring that health and safety regulations are strictly observed recorded and archived
• Monitoring the quality of the product and service provided
• Keeping to budgets and maintaining financial and administrative records
• Ensuring exemplary customer service for all visitors
• Pro-actively promote and maximise sales

The full job description for this role can be found here

To apply for this position please send a c.v. and covering letter to [email protected]



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