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Dec 14, 2007

The Future is Wild


The Future is Wild meets Twycross Zoo from Twycross Zoo - East Midland Zoological Society  
 
The Future is Wild meets Twycross Zoo’ is a collaboration between the zoo and the education department of Future is Wild (FIW)

‘The Future is Wild meets Twycross Zoo’ is a collaboration between the zoo and the education department of Future is Wild (FIW). By using the ideas of FIW to bring to life evolution, adaptation and how the planet changes the children could see science in action.

The workshops were launched in October of 2005, with 6 schools, 482 children participating. Austrey Primary School returned in January 2006 for a 2nd session. In January of 2007 10 schools attended a week of FIW sessions, over 600 children attended.

The two main objectives were to increase the children’s knowledge (over a variety of subjects) and to get them interested in learning more. The children participated in day long workshops, with an hour long introduction, time to explore the zoo and design their future animals and then a half an hour session in the classroom discussing their creations. The children were given questionnaires both before and after their session and the teachers completed an evaluation form. 
 

Developed by:  Twycross Zoo - East Midland Zoological Society



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